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asteroid news: Defense of the Earth against asteroids with missiles: protect the Earth from asteroids fired by missiles

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Italian astronomer Claudio Macone believes that the best way to protect our Earth from dangerous asteroids is to destroy them in advance. He says missiles should be fired at these asteroids while going into space. In a research paper, he also gave a plan on how and where to do it.

Makon first came up with this idea in 2002. He explains how missiles deployed in space can change the path of asteroids. To do this, a missile can be fired by stabilizing a spacecraft in a place in space where the gravity of the Earth and the Moon cancels out.

How is it going to happen?
Now Makon has reported that these asteroids can also be destroyed. He reported: “ By firing enough missiles from the Lagrangian L1-L3 points between Earth and Moon, Near Earth Objects (NEO) can be pulled out of the way to strike Earth. According to NASA, these are objects that pass close to our astronomical unit 1,3.

1 AU is the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Makon recently applied for a patent for software capable of creating program templates for it. However, he admitted that he is still in his early stages.

What are asteroids?
Asteroids are rocks that revolve around the sun like any planet, but are much smaller than planets. Most of the asteroids in our solar system are found in the asteroid belt in the orbit of Mars and Jupiter, that is, Mars and Jupiter. Apart from that, they orbit other planets and revolve around the sun with the planet.

About 4.5 billion years ago, when our solar system formed, the clouds of gas and dust that could not take the form of a planet and were left behind were transformed into these rocks, that is, asteroids.

Asteroids also have a different texture, as many are rocky, so one of them is made up of metals such as clay or nickel and iron. The study of asteroids is very important to get to the bottom of this solar system and how the planets are formed.

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