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Climate change The Earth is losing enough ice to cover all of Lake Superior each year

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The ravages of climate change are now clearly visible on earth Scientists have warned that every year 53,000 km of ice melts, which could have serious consequences for humans in times to come.
The ravages of climate change are now clearly visible on earth. In recent research, scientists warned that each year 53,000 km² of ice melts from the earth. Because of this, humans could face serious consequences in the times to come. He said that between 1979 and 2016, so much ice melted that it can fill the immense Lake Superior.

Ice-covered areas on Earth contain three-quarters of the total fresh water on Earth. If the areas of ice on earth are less, then this is a sign of increasing temperature on earth. Xiaoqing Peng, a geographer at Lanzhou University in China, said, “The icy areas of the Earth are the most sensitive indicators of the climate and at the same time show that the world is changing.

40% of the world’s population is affected by melting ice
“The change in the size of the frozen area on Earth reflects a major global change, not a regional or local change,” Peng said. Earlier in January, U.S. space agency NASA declared 2020 to be the hottest year. This means that the rate of ice melt must have accelerated. The global average temperature also increased by one degree Celsius between 1951 and 1980.

Prior to this research, widespread changes in snow-covered areas around the world had not yet been studied. The researchers measured this based on data from the satellite. Not only that, the depth of snow has also been measured around the world. They discovered that most of the snow was in the northern hemisphere. About 63,000 km² of snow melts each year. At the same time, there has been an increase in the snow-covered area in the southern hemisphere. Earlier in June, another research indicated that due to the rapid melting of the ice, 40 percent of the world’s population could be affected.

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