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Half of Spanish workers work overtime that is neither checked nor paid

Half of Spanish workers work overtime that is neither checked nor paid

Two years after the entry into force of the Time Control Act, the situation on the Spanish labor market with regard to “hidden overtime” has not improved as expected: half of Spanish workers perform still overtime which is neither controlled nor paid. . In any case, there is an improvement. These are the conclusions that emerge from the InfoJobs report on time monitoring and overtime collection.

Regarding time control, 1 in 4 employees (25%) still indicate that their company does not record the hours of their working day. In this sense, young people between 16 and 24 years old and those between 55 and 65 years old are those who in a greater proportion indicate that they are not subject to time control by their company (29%). If the question of overtime pricing is introduced into the equation, the conclusions drawn from it are much richer, in the same way that the differences by segment are accentuated, in terms of age, sex and of the position.

Thus, those who are in the last phase of their working life (55-65 years) are those who in the greatest proportion (61%) see their paid overtime; whereas, on the contrary, 44% of young people between 25 and 34 claim not to have received company remuneration for overtime.

Young people aged 16 to 34, the worst segment of the unemployed

To date, time control has not made it possible to reduce the overtime hours worked by professionals and not remunerated by the company. In this sense, 19% of the workforce indicates that they work between 1 and 2 hours overtime per week uncontrolled or paid; 19% more indicate that they play between 3 and 5 hours more; and 13% even say they work more than 5 hours of overtime per week without receiving financial compensation.

Here, young people aged 16 to 34 constitute the worst segment of the unemployed: up to 2 in 3 (62%) work more than an hour of overtime per week not checked or paid in their position; and 35.5% make three or more[1].

The higher the percentage of women in managerial and professional positions, the lower the number of unpaid overtime hours.

It is also significant that, in companies where there is a greater presence of women in management positions and more facilities for conciliation, the overtime worked decreases and at the same time it is more recognized. In companies with more than 50% women in positions of responsibility, the percentage of paid overtime is 62%. On the contrary, in companies where the percentage of women in managerial positions does not reach 5%, this figure drops to 49%. Indeed, the increase that exists is directly proportional: when the percentage of female managers is between 11 and 20%, the percentage of paid overtime increases to 54%; and in companies with between 21% and 50% women in positions of responsibility, this figure reaches 60%.

Likewise, in companies where there are reconciliation facilities, the percentage of paid overtime is 58%, compared to 49% for others where reconciliation is complicated.

The same goes for the number of overtime hours worked: 55% of companies with more than 50% of women in management do not work overtime; This percentage drops to 40% when we talk about companies with between 5 and 10% women in management positions.

The complicated situation of middle managers: same time control as specialists and overtime similar to those of executives and managers

By job type, you could say that middle managers experience the worst in every world. 77% indicate that they are subject to time control (a situation that occurs in the case of specialists -76% – but not that of executives and managers: up to 44% indicate that their company does not follow up of their hours); and, at the same time, 19% say they work more than 5 hours of overtime per week unpaid (11% in the case of specialists and 22% in the case of directors and managers).

The workers of the Community of Madrid, the least recognized in terms of overtime pay

By autonomous communities, Madrid workers (45%) are those who work the most overtime without receiving recognition in exchange for their company. Their situation has worsened over the past year due to COVID-19: in the last wave of June 2020, the figure was 38%. The Catalans (38%) and the Basques (36%) will follow in this direction.

On the other hand, since Andalusia is the community with the highest percentage of workers whose full working hours have been recognized and paid (14%, -6 percentage points above the rest of the regions), it is also the region in which they work the most overtime: almost 40% of Andalusians work more than 3 hours of overtime per week without pay.

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