Technology

Microsoft canceled development of new Calendar app

No one knows that Microsoft (and other big tech companies) are very inclined to launch projects and abandon them halfway. Development is a complex process where everything does not always go as planned. We can find all kinds of problems, from technical issues to changes in trade policy. This is the case with the “new” Windows 10 Calendar application.

Calendar (Preview): death announced for the first native application developed with React

Apparently, the latest victim of Microsoft’s usual criteria changes would have been the new Calendar app for Windows that many users have been testing for months as part of the Insider program.

The information comes from the Aggiornamenti Lumia Twitter account and the reason for this cancellation has not been revealed. It’s the only native Windows app that we were aware of having been significantly overhauled.

Microsoft could announce the death of Calendar Preview for Windows 10 very soon https://t.co/0C2ZyHg2h7 pic.twitter.com/11kR5QUG52

– Aggiornamenti Lumia (@ALumia_Italia) October 22, 2020

Microsoft was developing Calendar with React Native and this could be linked to the cancellation, as it was the first native Windows app to use this technology. Have they decided to go back to the old (and current) C # and XAML based development model?

Windows 10X is another example of Microsoft’s absolute discretion.

Now, equally baffling is that it was the only app Microsoft seemed to be revamping as its development was abruptly halted. This, coupled with the lack of information for months on the development of Windows 10X, offers a worrying panorama for enthusiasts of the company.

We know the folks at Redmond changed their minds about Windows 10X months ago. Based on what happened, they decided that this system should be launched in the spring of 2021, focusing on entry-level laptops and convertibles to compete directly with the Chromebook. In this case, we will have to wait to know the real reasons for this decision. Microsoft’s means, as we know, are impenetrable.

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