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Oldest plague victim: first strain of black plague bacteria found in skeleton in Latvia

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Amid the corona virus disaster, amazing information came out about the plague outbreak, bacteria from this outbreak were found in a human skull found in the European country of Latvia Scientists found evidence of Yersinia, the first strain of plague epidemic in Latvia, Riga.
In the midst of the corona virus disaster, amazing information has come out about the plague epidemic. Bacteria from this outbreak were found in a human skull found in Latvia, a European country. Scientists have found evidence of Yersinia, the first strain of the plague outbreak. A large number of people died in the 14th century due to this plague epidemic, called the “black plague”.

The Yersinia bacteria was found in the skull of a male hunter named RV 2039. It was found in the Rinnukalns region of Latvia. Genetic analysis showed that this ancient strain of plague was not as contagious and deadly as the medieval plague. It is believed that RV 2039 died in 3000 BC from an early strain of the plague.

Plaque bacteria found in RV 2039 skull

Half of the European population is victim of the plague epidemic
According to scientists, at that time this epidemic was developing very slowly and was not very contagious. However, over the next 4,300 years, the strain of the plague epidemic developed and became fatal to humans. He killed millions of people in Europe, Africa and India. It is said that between 1346 and 1353, half of the European population fell victim to the plague epidemic.

Genetic analysis of RV 2039 was performed by archaeologist Ben Krause-Kyora of Kyle University, Germany. He said the most important thing is that the origin of the plague virus now dates back 2,000 years and more. Ben said it looks like we are now very close to tracing the origin of the bacteria. Scientists have said that when the RV 2039 hunter died, it must have been between 20 and 30 years old.

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