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Pandemic triggers physiotherapist visits due to coronavirus-derived issues

Madrid

Update: Sunday, June 27, 2021 5:33 PM

Posted: 06/27/2021 5:31 PM

Alicia Sánchez continues to notice the consequences of the coronavirus months after beating the disease. The woman, as she says, spent a lot of time in bed, which affected her physically. “When I started walking I realized that my right foot was having difficulty. I couldn’t lift my instep,” he recalls, adding, “I couldn’t take ten consecutive steps. without feeling like my foot was moving. I was going; the stability I had was minimal. “

It was then that she began her rehabilitation at ‘AZ Recovery’, the physiotherapy center of Ángel Aneiros, who explains that Alicia “has an affected nerve which is responsible for the lateral muscles of her leg”.

The pandemic has caused the number of patients to skyrocket. In fact here, according to Aneiros, at least one in five has to do with COVID-19. The physiotherapist explains what are the most frequent problems linked to the coronavirus: “There are patients who have problems due to pulmonary fibrosis, or that the oxygen supply in the blood decreases, and they have more fatigue or weariness; neuropathic pathologies like Alicia ”.

In addition, he underlines that there are also “people who had never done sport before, and who, as long as they went out in the street, could go out for a run or cycle, which generated many sports injuries, such as muscle fractures.

Luciano Molina, professional rugby player, has also noticed the after-effects of the coronavirus. “I had a severe pain in my chest that made me restless when I climbed a ladder, or there were times I felt dizzy when I got up from the sofa,” he recalls.

Like Alicia, Luciano needed rehabilitation to be able to resume his life. “He was exercising to gain lung capacity and strength, and gradually increased the duration, repetitions and intensity of the exercises”, explains Samuel Requena, physiotherapist.

And it is that more than 60% of the patients who fell ill during the first wave of COVID-19 are still suffering from fatigue.

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