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“Summaries are nothing”

Updated: Wednesday 07 July 2021 10:13

Posted: 07.07.2021 10:11

Former president of the Community of Madrid Esperanza Aguirre, accused of six corruption offenses in the Púnica affair, denies “absolutely” the illegal financing of the Popular Party (PP) of Madrid and accuses the Central Operational Unit (UCO) of his situation of the Civil Guard in an interview which is part of the book “I do not know, I do not remember, I do not know”, of the journalist of LaSexta Alfonso Pérez Medina, who has been in bookstores and department stores since Wednesday. “The summaries are nothing, here the important thing is when the judge opens the oral trial and draws up the indictment”, specifies Aguirre.

In the interview, granted last April, the former head of the PP disputes the details contained in the summary that the National Court investigates between constant interruptions to the questions he does not like and rejects that the autonomous administration has hijacked 1% of the construction of large public works, such as hospitals, to the financing of the PP of Madrid, as indicated in the orders of judges Manuel García-Castellón and Eloy Velasco. On the other hand, he assures that this budget, dedicated to the advertising of works, was “a requirement of the European Union”.

“In all, in all the public works contracts, in all – the public works that Zapatero did, those that the government of Aznar did, those that the government of Felipe González did, the Bilbao metro -, in everything, the clause has to announce the work, to indicate directions when these are roads, where to go, to announce the inaugurations of new transportations, and in the case of hospitals, to explain to nurses and doctors who were going there that they must change, ”he argues.

He also accuses the journalist of not having read the court records. “If you read to yourself, if you read the letter that Councilor Manuel Lamela sent to the court, you may realize that this is not the case … It is impossible that you have read them. . If you believe that the 1% is an indication of corruption, because you have not read anything … “, he blurted out.

Blame the Civil Guard

After recalling that the presumption of innocence is “the basis of criminal justice”, Esperanza Aguirre attributes to UCO investigators his accusation of corruption, embezzlement of public funds, falsification of documents, influence peddling, forgery and lying electoral. “The UCO says it, eh? And then the prosecutors transcribe it and the judge copies it,” he said. When Pérez Medina reminds him that the criminal prosecution system works this way in Spain, the former president replies: “Hey, hey, hey! It was revealed in the investigation that this was not the case.”

Arpa Editores, who published the book, points out that “I don’t know, I don’t remember, I don’t know” brings together twenty years of research into dozens of forensic summaries in which the author constructs an impressive overview of the corruption in Spain.

In addition to the testimony of Esperanza Aguirre, it includes, among other things, unpublished statements by Judge Manuel García Castellón, who is investigating the plot of Commissioner Villarejo or the Púnica and Lezo cases, and interviews with judges, prosecutors, officials politicians and those convicted of corruption. Thus, judge Baltasar Garzón carries out an analysis of the Gürtel case, which he began to investigate before it leads to the investigation of box B of the PP; the instructor in the Nóos case, José Castro, assesses the possibilities of the King Emeritus being tried; or the anti-corruption attorney general, Alejandro Luzón, describes the workings of political criminal networks.

The title of the book refers to the famous expressions that Infanta Cristina de Borbón uttered in February 2014, when she was questioned in connection with the Nóos case, and which many corruption defendants propose when they have to return. accounts in court.

“I don’t know, I don’t remember, I don’t know” is on sale from this Wednesday, July 7 in bookstores and department stores.

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